We Africans have always told stories and communicated via art forms whether it be through songs and music, or sculptures and paintings.

Despite this, there is hardly any representation of great, contemporary African artwork in the international art market. I find this astonishing given the amount of amazing pieces I have seen myself when at home and in other African countries from Nigeria and Ghana, to Ethiopia , Kenya, South Africa and more . There is also an overwhelming amount of fantastic art overseas within the African diaspora that is not exhibited enough. How has the global art market not yet clocked on?

I realised that some of this may be due to a lack of information and exposure to modern and contemporary African art and its artists; and also perhaps art on the continent does not yet have the strong eco-system nor recognition from its local audiences that it needs.

There is an abundance of talent, yet not enough platforms nor policies that promote or support African art and design. And although there are a few, there is not enough representation between the artists themselves and potential buyers. So, I decided to create The Afropolitan Collector. 

The Afropolitan Collector is an art advisory platform that specialises in Modern and Contemporary African Art and Design.

We work with a range of clients and art organisations from government and non-profit, to auction houses, museums, galleries and independent artists.

Our dedication is not only to seek and select exceptional art for our clients; but also to further cultivate and promote the growing African art market.

We are obsessed with the art coming out of Africa and we see the value it possesses, not just economically from an investment viewpoint; but socially too. It is time to change the global African art narrative!

A. 

 
  Founder & Director, The Afropolitan Collector | Adora Mba    Adora is a Ghanaian-Nigerian who grew up in London, Lagos and Accra.    Having specialised in marketing and business development in the Luxury Goods sector, Adora worked for a global news channel as an African arts & culture editor for 2 years after completing her MA at Columbia University, New York. She has also previously worked for an international PR agency where she handled media relations for art clients; and she was the Communications Executive of a digital media platform.    Adora is currently based in Accra, Ghana where she runs the Afropolitan Collector while supporting and advising Ghana’s newly launched Creative Arts Council (under Ghana’s Ministry of Arts, Culture & Tourism); as well as continuing to collaborate with African art creatives, galleries, institutions and artists.

Founder & Director, The Afropolitan Collector | Adora Mba

Adora is a Ghanaian-Nigerian who grew up in London, Lagos and Accra.

Having specialised in marketing and business development in the Luxury Goods sector, Adora worked for a global news channel as an African arts & culture editor for 2 years after completing her MA at Columbia University, New York. She has also previously worked for an international PR agency where she handled media relations for art clients; and she was the Communications Executive of a digital media platform.

Adora is currently based in Accra, Ghana where she runs the Afropolitan Collector while supporting and advising Ghana’s newly launched Creative Arts Council (under Ghana’s Ministry of Arts, Culture & Tourism); as well as continuing to collaborate with African art creatives, galleries, institutions and artists.



"The love of beauty"

The Afropolitan Collector logo is made up two nsibidi symbols that depict 'love' and 'beauty' translated in modern language as: 'the love of beauty'.

Believed to be several centuries old, nsibidi icons have been found on excavated pottery, ceramic artefacts and headrests dating back to periods ranging between 400 and 1400 CE in the Calabar area of Cross River State, Nigeria.

Being Africa’s oldest scripted form behind hieroglyphics, nsibidi has been used to document history, celebrate people’s heritage, instruct values, reinforce communication, deliberate on key issues, and resolve conflicts of love and war. 

Though it is indigenous to the people occupying the southeastern region of modern Nigeria, nsibidi was more commonly associated with the Ejagham people of northern Cross River State where it is believed to have spread to surrounding ethnic groups like the Ibibios, Efiks, and Igbos, influencing their art forms and undergoing notable transformation in the process.